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Two New Studies Showing WHO Created Panic Over Coronavirus Was WAY Overblown And Death Rate Is FAR Lower Than Predicted

The WHO Lied and Created a Global Panic: Second Extensive Study Finds Coronavirus Mortality Rate Is 0.4% Not 3.4% — Similar to Seasonal Flu.

A study released this week in Germany last week found the mortality rate of the coronavirus factoring in the asymptomatic cases is much lower than is being reported.

The German study found that around 15% of the population in the Gangelt had the coronavirus antibodies and were infected at some point without knowing it. Using this data the researchers concluded that the coronavirus mortality rate was 0.37%.

second study in Iceland found that half of those tested had had the coronavirus and that only 7 in 1600 known COVID-19 cases ended in death.

This is good news.

It shows the coronavirus is only slightly more deadly than a seasonal flu.

This also means the experts at the World Health Organization were off by a factor of 10.

WHO leader, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, stoked fear across the planet when he claimed the COVID-19 had a 3.4% mortality rate and then compared that to the annual estimated flu mortality rate of 0.1%.

It’s not clear if he yet understands his mistake.

Regardless, it sent the global community into a collective economic meltdown.

We don’t know how horrible the economic damage will be but we know it will be huge.
And we are still nowhere near the total flu deaths we see each year.

And now we know Tedros was off by a factor of 10!

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